Paul Butterfield's - Better Days 12" Vinyl LP Album Cover Gallery and Description

- Bearsville Rhino Records, incl. Insert

"Better Days" is a 1973 blues masterpiece by American harmonica virtuoso and vocalist Paul Butterfield. With an ensemble featuring talented musicians like Ronnie Barron, Amos Garrett, and Geoff Muldaur, this album showcases Butterfield's deep blues roots and musical prowess. "Better Days" remains a timeless testament to his contribution to the genre, offering a captivating blend of blues and rock influences.This web-page has hi-res photos of the album covers, record label and a detailed description.

 

Front Cover Photo Of Paul Butterfield's Better Days Bearsville Rhino 12" Vinyl LP Album

Paul Butterfield's Better Days: A Blues Revival Amidst Change
Album Description:

Released in 1973, "Better Days" marked a significant turning point for blues harmonica legend Paul Butterfield. The early 70s saw the blues genre facing challenges as rock music diversified and audiences' tastes evolved. With "Better Days," Butterfield embraced these changes while remaining true to his blues roots.

Historical Context and Musical Exploration

By 1973, Butterfield had already cemented his place as a blues pioneer. His earlier work with the Paul Butterfield Blues Band had helped introduce electric blues to a wider audience and had influenced countless musicians. With "Better Days," he assembled a new band and embarked on a musical exploration that blended traditional blues with elements of rock, folk, and country.

Musical Genre and Sound

"Better Days" is a roots rock album with a strong blues foundation. Butterfield's harmonica playing remains at the forefront, delivering soulful solos and emotive melodies. The band's instrumentation includes electric and acoustic guitars, keyboards, bass, and drums, creating a rich and textured sound. Songs like "New Walkin' Blues," "Broke My Baby's Heart," and "Buried Alive in the Blues" showcase the album's eclectic mix of blues, rock, and folk influences.

Production Team and Recording Studio

"Better Days" was co-produced by Butterfield himself and Geoff Muldaur, a multi-instrumentalist and singer-songwriter known for his work in folk and blues music. The album was recorded at Bearsville Studios in Woodstock, New York, a renowned facility that had hosted numerous influential artists.

Paul Butterfield: A Blues Harmonica Trailblazer
Butterfields Career Description:

Born in Chicago in 1942, Paul Butterfield emerged as a pivotal figure in the blues revival of the 1960s and continued to shape the genre throughout his career. His powerful harmonica playing, soulful vocals, and innovative approach to blending blues with rock, folk, and soul music made him a trailblazer in the American music scene.

Early Life and Blues Immersion (1960s)

Butterfield's passion for blues music ignited in his youth, fueled by the vibrant blues scene in Chicago. He frequented clubs where he witnessed legendary blues musicians, immersing himself in the raw energy and soulful sounds of the genre.

In 1963, Butterfield formed the Paul Butterfield Blues Band, which quickly became a cornerstone of the blues revival movement. The band's lineup featured a diverse group of talented musicians, including guitarists Mike Bloomfield and Elvin Bishop, bassist Jerome Arnold, and drummer Sam Lay.

The Paul Butterfield Blues Band's self-titled debut album in 1965 was a groundbreaking release, blending traditional blues with electric instrumentation and a rock sensibility. The album's success propelled the band to national prominence, and they became regulars at major music festivals, including the Newport Folk Festival and Monterey Pop Festival.

Musical Evolution and Collaboration (1970s-1980s)

In the 1970s, Butterfield embarked on a solo career, experimenting with different musical styles and collaborating with a wide range of artists. His solo albums, such as "Better Days" (1973) and "Put It in Your Ear" (1976), showcased his evolving sound, incorporating elements of rock, folk, and soul into his blues foundation.

Butterfield also collaborated with other influential musicians during this period. He joined forces with "The Band" for their iconic "The Last Waltz" concert in 1976, and he recorded and toured with Bonnie Raitt, John Mayall, and Muddy Waters.

Legacy and Influence

Butterfield's impact on the blues and rock genres is undeniable. His innovative approach to blending blues with other musical styles helped to expand the genre's boundaries and reach new audiences. His powerful harmonica playing and soulful vocals inspired countless musicians, and his collaborations with other artists further solidified his place as a blues icon.

Butterfield's musical journey was cut short by his untimely death in 1987, but his legacy continues to resonate. His music remains a testament to his passion, talent, and unwavering commitment to the blues. He is remembered as a pioneer who helped to shape the sound of American music and whose influence continues to inspire musicians today.

Music Genre:

Blues

Album Production information:

Produced by Paul Butterfield and Geoff Muldaur

Record Label Information:

Bearsville Rhino RNLP 70877

Album Packaging 

This album includes the 12" insert with lyrics of all the songs performed by Paul Butterfield

Media Format:

12" Full-Length Vinyl LP

Album weight: 230 gram

Year & Country:

1973 Made in USA
Band Members and Musicians :
    Band-members, Musicians and Performers
  • Paul Butterfield
  • Ronnie Barron
  • Amos Garrett
  • Geoff Muldaur
  • Christophe Packer
  • Billy Rich
Track Listing of: Paul Butterfield's Better Days

The Song/tracks on "Paul Butterfield's Better Days" are

    Side One:
  • Walking Blues
  • Broke My Baby's Heart
  • Highway 28
  • Buried Alive in The Blues
  • Done a Lot of Wrong Things
  • Rule the Road
  • Nobody's Fault But Mine
  • Baby Please Don't Go
  • Please Send me Someone to Love

Paul Butterfield's Better Days Bearsville Rhino 12" Vinyl LP Album High Resolution & Quality Photos

Front Cover Photo Of Paul Butterfield's Better Days Bearsville Rhino 12" Vinyl LP Album
Front Cover Photo Of Paul Butterfield's Better Days Bearsville Rhino 12" Vinyl LP Album

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Note: The images on this page are photos of the actual album. Slight differences in color may exist due to the use of the camera's flash. Images can be zoomed in/out ( eg pinch with your fingers on a tablet or smartphone )

Photo Of The Back Cover Paul Butterfield's Better Days Bearsville Rhino 12" Vinyl LP Album
Photo of album back cover Paul Butterfield's Better Days Bearsville Rhino 12" Vinyl LP Album

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Close up of record's label Paul Butterfield's Better Days Bearsville Rhino 12" Vinyl LP Album Side One:
Close up of record's label Paul Butterfield's Better Days Bearsville Rhino 12" Vinyl LP Album Side One

BEARSVILLE RECORDS RNLP 70877 Record Label Details Made in U.S.A. ℗ 1973 Warner Bros Records Inc., Rhino

Index of PAUL BUTTERFIELD (Solo) Album Cover Gallery & 12" Vinyl LP Discography Information

PAUL BUTTERFIELD Biography of Paul Butterfield: American Blues Harmonica Player and Singer

Early Life and Musical Beginnings

Paul Butterfield was born on December 17, 1942, in Chicago, Illinois. Raised in the Hyde Park neighborhood, Butterfield was exposed to a rich variety of musical genres from a young age. His interest in music began with classical flute lessons, but he soon found his true calling in blues harmonica. Butterfield was heavily influenced by the Chicago blues scene, particularly by artists like Muddy Waters and Howlin' Wolf.

Formation of the Paul Butterfield Blues Band

In the early 1960s, Butterfield formed the Paul Butterfield Blues Band with guitarist Elvin Bishop. The band quickly gained a reputation for their energetic live performances and innovative sound, which blended electric Chicago blues with rock and roll. Their self-titled debut album, released in 1965, was a critical and commercial success. Notable tracks like "Born in Chicago" and "Blues with a Feeling" showcased Butterfield's raw harmonica skills and soulful vocals.

Success and Influence

The Paul Butterfield Blues Band's second album, "East-West" (1966), further cemented their status as pioneers of blues-rock. The album featured the groundbreaking title track, an instrumental piece that incorporated elements of jazz, Indian raga, and psychedelia. This experimental approach influenced many contemporary musicians and helped bridge the gap between blues and rock.

Throughout the late 1960s, the band performed at major music festivals, including the Monterey Pop Festival and Woodstock, bringing blues to a wider audience. Butterfield's collaborations with other legendary musicians, such as Mike Bloomfield and Al Kooper, also contributed to his growing influence in the music world.

The 1970s: A Period of Transition

The 1970s marked a period of transition for Butterfield and his musical career. In 1971, he formed a new band, Paul Butterfield's Better Days , featuring guitarist Amos Garrett, pianist Ronnie Barron, and saxophonist David Sanborn. This group leaned more towards a rootsy, Americana sound compared to the electric blues of the original Blues Band. They released two albums, "Better Days" (1972) and "It All Comes Back" (1973), both of which received positive reviews but did not achieve the same level of commercial success as Butterfield's earlier work.

Collaborations and Guest Appearances

During the late 1970s and early 1980s, Butterfield continued to perform and record, often as a guest artist. He collaborated with a wide range of musicians, including Muddy Waters, Bonnie Raitt, and The Band. His appearance at The Last Waltz concert in 1976, organized by The Band, was particularly memorable. Butterfield's harmonica solo on "Mystery Train" was a highlight of the evening and showcased his enduring talent and versatility.

Later Years and Legacy

In the early 1980s, Butterfield faced health challenges, including a battle with peritonitis. Despite these difficulties, he continued to perform and record, releasing the album "North-South" in 1981. This period also saw him exploring new musical territories, incorporating elements of jazz and funk into his blues-based sound.

Tragically, Paul Butterfield passed away on May 4, 1987, at the age of 44. His death marked the end of an era for blues music, but his influence lives on. Butterfield's pioneering work in the 1960s and 1970s helped to bring blues music to a broader audience and inspired countless musicians. He was posthumously inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 2015, a testament to his enduring impact on the music world.

PAUL BUTTERFIELD's - Better Days 12" Vinyl LP
PAUL BUTTERFIELD's - Better Days album front cover vinyl record

Released in 1973, "Better Days" marked a significant turning point for blues harmonica legend Paul Butterfield. The early 70s saw the blues genre facing challenges as rock music diversified and audiences' tastes evolved.

Learn more
PAUL BUTTERFIELD - Put it in your Ear 12" Vinyl LP
PAUL BUTTERFIELD - Put it in your Ear album front cover vinyl record

Released in 1976, "Put It In Your Ear" captures Paul Butterfield at a crossroads in his musical journey. The mid-70s marked a period of experimentation for the blues legend, as he sought to expand his sonic palette

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